Introduction to Qualified Opportunity Funds

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act added sections 1400Z-1 and 1400Z-2 to the Internal Revenue Code. The former provides for the designation of certain low-income communities as "qualified opportunity zones," and the later provides certain incentives for investment in such QOZs. IRS Notice 2018-48 provides a full list of population census tracts designated as qualified opportunity zones; investments within these zones can qualify for the new tax incentive.

The tax incentive permits a taxpayer who has realized a capital gain from the sale of property to an unrelated person to invest all or part of the gain amount into a "qualified opportunity fund" within 180 days of the realization event and elect to defer paying tax on the gain amount so invested. The deferral lasts until the earlier of (a) the date that the taxpayer sells the QOF investment or (b) December 31, 2026.

In addition, if the taxpayer holds the QOF investment for at least five years, ten percent of the deferred gain is permanently excluded from taxation, and if the taxpayer holds the QOF investment for at least seven years, a total of fifteen percent of the deferred gain is permanently excluded from taxation. Finally, if the taxpayer holds the QOF investment for at least ten years, all post-acquisition gain on the QOF investment can be permanently excluded from taxation.

A QOF is an entity organized as a corporation or a partnership for the purpose of investing in QOZ property. Such an entity uses IRS Form 8996 to initially certify that it is organized to invest in QOZ property as well as annually report that it meets the investment standards. Generally speaking, a QOF must hold 90% of its assets in QOZ property or pay a penalty. This tax incentive is a new and important opportunity for many taxpayers with capital gains.

See Maule, 597-2nd T.M., Tax Incentives for Economically Distressed Areas; Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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